Essay: The Strange Case of Professor Procrastinate and Consequentialism

Written by Chan Kei Nin This paper argues that both actualism and possibilism are inadequate in providing a satisfactory answer to whether Professor Procrastinate, as a consequentialist, ought to accept or decline the invitation to write a book review. The paper explores the main problems of actualism and possibilism that lead to this inadequacy, and … Continue reading Essay: The Strange Case of Professor Procrastinate and Consequentialism

Longform: A Defence of the Right to Marriage for Same-Sex Couples

Written by Marcus Teo, Artwork by Hoo Yan Han In the present work, I provide a defence of same-sex marriage. To these ends, I invoke two concepts to justify the right to marriage for same-sex couples: 1) the non-interference condition of liberty, and 2) the maximization of wellbeing. Given that both concepts are justifications for … Continue reading Longform: A Defence of the Right to Marriage for Same-Sex Couples

Essay: Beyond Ethical Implications – Self-Driving Cars and the Human Experience

Written by Melissa Chang, Artwork by Hoo Yan Han Much has been discussed with regards to the ethical implications of self-driving cars, but cars perform a much larger role in our lives than being mere modes of transport. Beyond the convenience they provide, the car, with its complex engineering and socializing elements, serves purposes we … Continue reading Essay: Beyond Ethical Implications – Self-Driving Cars and the Human Experience

Review: “Moralizing Technology” by Peter-Paul Verbeek

Written by Ooi Teck Chye, Artwork by Ngiam Li Yi Introduction In Moralizing Technology: Understanding and Designing the Morality of Things, Peter-Paul Verbeek aims to broaden the scope of ethics to better accommodate the technological age, and in doing so he reveals the inseparable nature of humanity and technology. Verbeek’s main argument is made in … Continue reading Review: “Moralizing Technology” by Peter-Paul Verbeek

Conversation: Professor Frank Jackson

Former philosophy undergraduate, Harisan Nasir, and current philosophy undergraduate, Shalom Chalson, recently had the opportunity to speak with Australian philosopher, Professor Frank Jackson. This is their email interview. NYPR: How did you come to study, work in, and teach philosophy?  Professor Frank Jackson: My parents were both philosophers, that was certainly a factor. Nevertheless, I … Continue reading Conversation: Professor Frank Jackson